Modelling group
at the Department of Medical Biometry, University of Tübingen

français deutsch
About us

Research
Influenza
Emerging diseases
Smallpox
Measles
Poliomyelitis
Malaria
Onchocerciasis
Filariases
  Introduction
  Eradicability
       Summary
       Pesistence graph
       Uncertainties
       Limitation and control
       Limitation
       Facilitation
  Model
  Dispersion patterns
  Glossary
Leishmaniasis
Haemophilus
Pneumococci
Others

Methods

Publications

Public Relations

Impressum

Filaria infections

Blinded man guided by child
Onchocerciasis:
Blinded man guided by child

(Source: WHO/TDR/image 9103125)
Filariases
  Eradicability
       Pesistence graph
       Uncertainties
       Limitation and control
       Limitation
       Facilitation
  Model
  Dispersion patterns
  Glossary
LF patient
Lymphatic Filariasis:
Patient with lymphedema

(Source: WHO/TDR/image 01021669)
Among the parasitic diseases that result from an infection with filarial nematodes, onchocerciasis and lymphatic filariasis are the two most prevalent diseases, with ~17 million and ~120 million people being infected, respectively.

Both diseases can substantially impair the individual (pathology, increased mortality) and the population (socioeconomic development) and are subject to major intervention programs by the World Health Organization (WHO). The Onchocerciasis Control Programme (OCP), initiated in 1974 in seven West African countries and performed over an extended area until the end of 2002, was based on vector control by aerial application of larvicides. Its successor program, the African Programme for Onchocerciasis Control (APOC), relies mainly on mass drug administration of the microfilaricide ivermectin. The Global Programme to Eliminate Lymphatic Filariasis (GPELF) was launched in 1998 and is based on mass drug administration of various microfilaricides.

With our work, with the methods of modeling and simulation, we try to support the control of these diseases, to improve our understanding of what the parasite makes persisting, and thus, to understand how we can optimize the control of these diseases.
Responsible for this page: Dr. H.-P. Duerr
Webmaster: Prof. Dr. M. Eichner (last change of this page on 13 July 2009)
Disclaimer: Eberhard-Karls-University Tübingen, Tübingen University Hospital, the Department for Medical Biometry (IMB), and the authors of this page disclaim all liability for the content of any page referenced by hyper-link from this page

You are the  th visitor of our pages.