In this section you can download the ClimaSec Working Papers

 

Working Paper 1 (March 2013):  Thomas Diez, Julia Grauvogel: Securitising Climate Change, Framing Climate Change: Discursive Struggles and the Environment. This paper discusses the idea of various diverging ways of framing climate change as a security issue, which in turn also lead to different consequences.  

 

Working Paper 2 (July 2013):  Franziskus von Lucke: It’s domestic politics, stupid! The US climate field: policies, actors and consequences. This paper deals with US climate policies in the last two decades. It gives a detailed account of the various developments on the domestic level, the US behavior in international negotiations and of the most relevant actors in the climate field. 

 

Working Paper 3 (July 2013):  Franziskus von Lucke: The emerging vanguard? Mexico’s climate politics: policies, actors and consequences.  The paper looks at the Mexican case study. It discusses the political developments concerning climate change on the domestic level as well as the Mexican behavior in international negotiations. Moreover, the paper gives a detailed account of the most relevant actors that are involved in the Mexican climate politics field.

 

Working Paper 4 (September 2013):  Franziskus von Lucke, Thomas Diez, Zehra Wellmann: What's at Stake in Securitising Climate Change? Towards a Differentiated Approach. The paper develops a theoretical framework for studying different climate-security-discourses and their political consequences. The framework is based on two dimensions: firstly, the level of the referent object of securitsation, e.g. territorial, individual, and planetary. Secondly, a distinction in made between discourses using traditional security conceptions and those focusing primarily on risk.

 

Working Paper 5 (January 2014): Zehra Wellmann: Germany and Climate Change: An Ambivalent Forerunner? This paper deals with German climate policies. It gives a detailed account of the various developments on the domestic level, the German behavior in international negotiations and of the most relevant actors in the climate field.  

 

Working Paper 6 (January 2014): Zehra Wellmann: Turkey and climate change: An evolving issue in a developing country or no change for climate change? This paper looks at the Turkish case study.  It analyses the political developments concerning climate change on the domestic level as well as the Turkish behavior in international negotiations. Furthermore, the paper gives a detailed account of the most relevant actors that are involved in the Turkish climate politics field. 

 

Working Paper 7 (March 2014): Franziskus von Lucke: Counter Securitization or Slippery Slope? The Political Implications of Different Climate Security Discourses. Drawing on Michel Foucault’s governmentality approach and focusing on the US case, this paper analyses whether different climate-security discourses have led to different political implications and policies in the country

 

Working Paper 8 (September 2014): Franziskus von Lucke, Zehra Wellmann, Thomas Diez: Klimakämpfe: Eine Komparative Studie der Versicherheitlichung von Klimawandel (the paper is written in German). Based on our discursive securitisation approach (explained in more detail in working paper 4) we analyze the securitisation of climate change in four countries (USA, Germany, Turkey and Mexico) in a comparative manner. Our aim is to uncover the dominant climate-security discourses, the main actors, the resulting policies and the preconditions that made possible these unique securitsations in each county. Thus, this comparison allows us to make some general assertions about the success conditions and political consequences of different securitisations.

 

Working Paper 9 (May 2015): Franziskus von Lucke: The Attempted Securitisation of Climate Change in Mexico: Explorations into Actors, Processes and Consequences. This paper focuses on the attempted securitisation of climate change in Mexico. It explores which actors tried to connect climate change to security discourses and gives a detailed analysis of how these securitisation moves eventually failed. 

 

Working Paper 10 (June 2015): Franziskus von Lucke: The Securitisation of Climate Change in the United States: The Integration of Climate Threats Into the Security Sector. This paper deals with the securitisation of climate change in the United States between 1990 and 2015. It gives a detailed account of how a few think tanks and individuals, as discursive entrepreneurs, successfully reframed climate change as a threat to the national security of the US. In addition, the paper shows how this particular framing has led to the integration of climate change into the planning of the security, defence and intelligence sector.