Religion

Prof. Klaus Antoni

Prof. Antoni (born in 1953), is teaching and carrying on research since 1998 at the University of Tübingen. He holds the professorship in Japanese Studies with special focus on Japanese cultural theories. Previously, he held the professorship (C4) at the University of Hamburg (1987-1993) and at the University of Trier (1993-1998). From 2010 to 2016, he has also been Vice-Dean of research at the Faculty of Humanities. Current core research areas are: intellectual and religious history of Japan, relations between religion (Shintô) and political ideology in Japan, „sacred scripts“ and political mythology in Japan, theory of Japanese fairy tales, literature in Old Japan. Furthermore: intercultural communication, Japanese cultural theories; relations between Japan and Asia. Further information ...

Prof. Dr. Johann Büssow

Johann Brüssow teaches and carries out research on the history of modern Middle East. Since 2013 he owns the professorship for Islamic history and culture at the department of oriental and islamic studies. Together with Dr. Yuval Ben-Bassat (Haifa/Berkeley) he is head of the research project about the history of the city and region of Gaza in late 19th and early 20st century. His current focal points are: Politics, society and urban development in late Ottoman Gaza; history of Beoudins and arid areas in modern Middle East; conceptual history and historical semantics in global perspective. Further information...

Prof. Dr. Heidrun Eichner

Further information...

Private Lecturer Dr. Sabine Klocke-Daffa

PD Dr. Sabine Klocke-Daffa (born in 1956) teaches and does research in Tübingen since 2008. She is a lecturer at the department of social and cultural anthropology and spokesperson of the post graduate program „Networks and Resource complexes“ of the Collaborative Research Center 1070 „ResourceCultures“ as well as the second head of the project „Resources and public relations“. Her current focal points are: Social security and exchange systems, basic income grant, networks and cultural dynamics of resources and applied anthropology. Her regional focus lies in Africa, especially Southern Africa. Further Information...

Prof. Dr. Heike Oberlin

Prof. Dr. Heike Oberlin is in charge of the scientific coordination of the Institute for Asian and Oriental Studies and extracurricular professor at the department of Indian Studies. Additionaly, since 2014, she is Equality and Diversity Officer of the Faculty of Humanities. Her focal points are forms of performativity in India, especially the Sanskrit theater Kūṭiyāṭṭam, the language and literature of Malayāḷam, South Indian palm leaves manuscripts, gender and Indian folk religions. Her regional interest is Kerala/South India. In 2008, she won the Ernst-Waldschmidt price of the Foundation “Preußischer Kulturbesitz” for her work on Sanskrit theater Kūṭiyāṭṭam. Further information...

Prof. Dr. Monika Schrimpf

My research interests are in Japanese history of religion, with a particular focus on modern and contemporary times. Presently, my research focuses on the fields of gender and religion, as well as medicine and religion in Japan. With regard to the first topic, I investigate the role of gender concepts in the self-understandings of contemporary ordained Buddhist women, thus reconstructing changed interpretations of religious roles. Besides, I examine diverse ways in which religion and medicine are entangled in contemporary Japan, asking for strategies of legitimation and self-positioning among religious actors offering therapeutic practices. Here, Buddhism and new religious movements serve as examples. I am professor for Japanese Studies at the Institute of Asian and Oriental Studies of the University of Tübingen since 2014. Further information...