News

09.08.2017 10:50

"Robin Hood Effects" on Motivation in Math

Family interest is much more important than income, education or occupation, University of Tübingen researchers find

Students from families with little interest in math benefit more from a school intervention program that aims at increasing math motivation than do students whose parents regard math as important. A study by re-searchers at the Hector Research Institute of Education Sciences and Psychology indicates the intervention program has a "Robin Hood effect" which reduces the "motivational gap" between students from different family backgrounds because new information about the importance of math is made accessible to underprivileged students. Something known as the "Matthew effect" did not take place in this study. The "Matthew effect" says that students who already have good foundations and are therefore more privileged, profit most from an intervention. The results of the study were recently published in Developmental Psychology.


The Tübingen researchers first analyzed data on the attitudes towards math of roughly 1,900 German ninth-grade students and their parents. The students then took part in a teaching unit about the usefulness of math that was conducted by the researchers. In a presentation, they were given important information about the significance of mathematics for students' future careers and their daily life. Afterwards they either wrote an essay about the usefulness of math or evaluated interview quotations about math's relevance.


At six weeks and at five months after the intervention, the students were again asked about their motivation towards math. The intervention showed several "Robin Hood effects" on the students’ utility and attain-ment values as well as on students' effort: the motivation of students from families with little interest in math was more positively affected than the motivation of students from families with greater interest in the subject. Yet the differential effects were observed only five months after the teach-ing unit. Six weeks after the intervention no differential effects were ap-parent. "Our assumption was that there would be a delayed effect on the motivation of less privileged students, since it would take some time for them to reflect on and internalize the information they received during the teaching unit," explains Isabelle Häfner. This so-called "sleeper-effect" grows stronger the more time passes, she adds.


The study results also suggest that it is not the socioeconomic status of their families – education, income and occupation – that is central for students' motivation to learn, but rather their parents’ interest in a subject. "If parents are interested in math for example, this might affect the way they spend their free time. They spend more time talking about a subject with their children, thereby passing on their interest in it," says Häfner. Students from families with little interest in math, on the other hand, do not have access to this kind of information. When they receive it at school, they may profit more greatly because the novelty of the information encourages them to reflect on it. One of the two project leaders and director of the Hector Research Institute of Education Sciences and Psychology, Ulrich Trautwein, stresses the importance of this finding: "Often children who are al-ready privileged are those who end up benefitting from additional programs. Our results highlight the potential of classroom interventions to reduce motivational gaps between students from families with fewer and students from families with greater motivational resources."

Original publication:

Häfner, I., Flunger, B., Dicke, A.-L., Gaspard, H., Brisson, B. M., Nagengast, B., & Trautwein, U. (2017). Robin Hood effects on motivation in math: Family interest moderates the effect of relevance interventions. Developmental Psychology. Advance Online Publication. doi: 10.1037/dev0000337

Contact details:

Prof. Dr. Ulrich Trautwein
University of Tübingen
LEAD Graduate School & Research Network/
Hector Research Institute of Education Sciences and Psychology
Phone +49 7071 29-73931
ulrich.trautwein[at]uni-tuebingen.de
www.lead.uni-tuebingen.de
www.hib.uni-tuebingen.de

 

 

 

 

 

Eberhard Karls Universität Tübingen
Public Relations Department
Dr. Karl Guido Rijkhoek
Director

 

Antje Karbe
Press Officer
Phone +49 7071 29-76789
Fax +49 7071 29-5566
antje.karbe[at]uni-tuebingen.de
www.uni-tuebingen.de/aktuell